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Newly-elected Rwandan Parliament led by women, but lacks power | Hunter of Justice

Newly-elected Rwandan Parliament led by women, but lacks power

by on October 15, 2008  •  In Uncategorized

guardian.co.uk
By Erin Baines, Stephen Brown & Susan Thomson

Last month, Rwanda achieved something no other country had ever done before: produce a legislature in which women outnumber men. The results of last month's parliamentary elections gave women 45 out of the 80 seats in the chamber of deputies, or 56%. This surpasses Rwandan women's near parity in the outgoing parliament, already the highest proportion in the world. Rwandan President Paul Kagame praised the election results, saying that a female majority in parliament "emphasises the fact that the country's future is being shaped by women."

Only 14 years after the 1994 genocide, Rwanda has risen from the ashes to become a gender-equality trailblazer. Women enjoy many rights previously denied to them, including the right to own land, to open a bank account and to start a business. The government see women as critical partners to alleviate rural poverty and diversify the economy, moving from dependence on agriculture to a more knowledge-based one. To promote the role of women in politics, the constitution reserves 30% of the seats in parliament for women. The ruling party (Rwandan Patriotic Front, RPF) placed many women at the top of its lists of candidates. It has also appointed numerous women to senior government posts. By March of this year, women held eight of 20 cabinet seats, including the foreign affairs portfolio.

However, a sombre second look at the politics of Rwanda's gender revolution reveals a less optimistic interpretation of the election results. First, the vote may have been quite free (on election day), but the elections were hardly fair. Only the ruling party, its coalition partners and two other pro-RPF parties ran in the elections. …

Second, even as women's visibility in politics is at an all-time high, their ability to shape the future of the country, ironically, has not improved. Rwanda's parliament has limited influence. Power is heavily concentrated in the hands of President Kagame and his close advisors. Parliamentarians – be they male or female – actually have very little power to legislate on behalf of their constituents. …

…Some 90% of Rwandan women are peasants who rely on subsistence agriculture. Few have benefited from the country's progressive gender policies or relatively high rates of economic growth. The gap between the living standards of some wealthy urbanites and most rural dwellers is actually increasing. ….

Rwanda's post-genocide government understandably seeks to maintain peace and security. It does so in part through a policy of national unity and reconciliation. It has banned references to ethnicity from public discourse: Rwanda is a land of all Rwandans and there no longer are any Hutu, Tutsi or Twa. Though these are arguably laudable objectives, the government uses this policy as a tool to suppress dissent and silence criticism….

The Rwandan government, representatives of the United Nations, western donors and feminist organisations celebrate Rwanda's milestone in women's parliamentary representation, claiming it is the result of enlightened attitudes and great vision. Such accounts gloss over these women's very limited role in policymaking, the continued marginalisation of the vast majority of Rwandan women, and the government's superficial commitment to democratic governance….

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5 Responses to Newly-elected Rwandan Parliament led by women, but lacks power

  1. Alegisi October 18, 2008 at 7:33 PM

    The authors use this positive story as an excuse, pursuant to their own agenda presumably, to suggest that there is nothing good in Rwanda right now. This is not so. All women benefit from the peace and security in Rwanda and for example the reductions in incidences of HIV and malaria – pursuant to govt initiatives – and corruption and the improvement in the roads.
    More girl students go to school and perform better. There are more educational opportunities. Many govt ministries and major institutions are headed by women. They are not particularly well paid and do not have expensive perks. Compare this with other countries.
    It is quite clear that the Rwandan govt has the political will to improve living standards for everyone and only 14 years after the 1994 Genocide which left the country decimated much progress has been made. In a poor densely populated country development takes time. In fact what has happended in Rwanda begs the question as to why other countries, many with natural resources for example, cannot do as well or better.
    The legacy of the Genocide is happily something the authors do not have to deal with. Do they really think that ethnically based parties are a good idea?

  2. Nan Hunter October 18, 2008 at 10:55 PM

    Thanks so much for taking the time to post your comment. You raise really good questions. It is difficult for non-Rwandans to get an accurate feel for what is going on.

  3. alaroker October 30, 2008 at 12:19 PM

    Why do you assume that the authors do not have to deal with the legacies of the genocide? why is it always an accusation that you are western, and so cant know? did you think they might have BEEN there during the genocide and many other horrific events in Africa – to witness and carry that struggle forward in their own personal and political lives, that they too have lived through trauma and contiune, every single day, to work, live, think and strive for peace and security for all in Rwanda and beyond? Your assumptions are so dismissive and frankly, repetitive of all the other people who think they know better than those with a western last name.

  4. alaroker October 30, 2008 at 12:20 PM

    Why do you assume that the authors do not have to deal with the legacies of the genocide? why is it always an accusation that you are western, and so cant know? did you think they might have BEEN there during the genocide and many other horrific events in Africa – to witness and carry that struggle forward in their own personal and political lives, that they too have lived through trauma and contiune, every single day, to work, live, think and strive for peace and security for all in Rwanda and beyond? Your assumptions are so dismissive and frankly, repetitive of all the other people who think they know better than those with a western last name.

  5. alaroker October 30, 2008 at 12:20 PM

    Why do you assume that the authors do not have to deal with the legacies of the genocide? why is it always an accusation that you are western, and so cant know? did you think they might have BEEN there during the genocide and many other horrific events in Africa – to witness and carry that struggle forward in their own personal and political lives, that they too have lived through trauma and contiune, every single day, to work, live, think and strive for peace and security for all in Rwanda and beyond? Your assumptions are so dismissive and frankly, repetitive of all the other people who think they know better than those with a western last name.

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